Category Archives: Uncategorised

Norfolk Swift Response

Norfolk Swift Response and Community alarm userAre you an Older Person living in Norfolk? Or do you have physical illness or difficulties? Or learning difficulties?

If yes to any of these: Do you have the Norfolk Swift Response number by your phone? You should do!

Who are ‘The Swifts’?

A fantastic, trained, team of people, on hand to help you with any ‘urgent unplanned need at home’ which does not require the Emergency Services.

For example, if you have a fall and are unable to get up but are not physically hurt in any way. Or if you live alone and are struck by a violent stomach bug leaving you temporarily unable to get up or to get food. Or if your partner who cares for you has been taken to hospital. In all of these scenarios and many more, the ‘Swifts’ can help you.

Norfolk Swift Response and your Lifeline Alarm

Within Norfolk, if you press your Alarm Pendant because you have had a fall but are unhurt, it may well be the Swifts who come to your aid. They work together with the Alarm Service, and would come if you press your button but we’ve not been able to ascertain the situation and your local key-holders aren’t available.

How to contact the Swifts

It is a Free Service to residents in Norfolk, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call them on:

0344 800 8020

More information is available from Norfolk County Council.



Contact Care takes on My Marathon

Contact Care Lifelines running a marathon

Contact Care Lifelines take on My Marathon


The whole of the Norfolk-based Contact Care team are taking on the Challenge. We are each running or walking 26.2 miles during the month of May. We are raising money for the British Heart Foundation. Many of our lifeline users suffer from heart conditions so this is something important to us. We hear stories regularly as we jot down your medical history, of heart surgeries, stents and pacemakers. These were once medical ‘break-through’s. Just imagine what further improvements can become every-day life-saving thanks to the British Heart Foundation.

You can support us by donating and keeping us running at:    Contact Care supporting the British Heart Foundation


Kat Navarro, Contact Care

British Heart Foundation, My Marathon.

Nuts are not just for Christmas!

nuts-articleI have just got back from my MOT with the nurse: cholesterol and blood-sugar levels were checked, blood pressure taken, BMI recorded. At the end of which the kindly nurse gave me a percentage risk score for developing heart disease or diabetes.

The process got me thinking, so I was particularly interested to then read about nuts reducing the risk of these very conditions.

Recent research shows that eating 28 grams (a handful) of nuts daily reduces your risk of developing diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

It is from a robust analysis of 20 previous studies, carried out in Norway. It was funded by a charitable trust, health authority and university, so is a pretty trustworthy source.

However, as is so often the case with studies into diet and health, the researchers cannot 100% prove nuts are the sole cause of these outcomes. It’s hard to discount the possibility that nuts were just one component of a healthier lifestyle pattern, including balanced diet and regular physical activity. It could be this overall picture that is reducing risk, not just nuts.

Bearing this in mind, the study of 376,228 adults did find nut consumption reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease. Each 28 gram/day serving was linked with a 21% reduced risk. (nb. if you have a family history of heart disease, a healthy diet including nuts can help, but still may not be able to eliminate the risk entirely).

The study of 304,285 adults found that one serving of nuts per day reduced risk of any cancer by 15%.

And of recorded 85,870 recorded deaths within the huge study group, one serving of nuts a day was linked with a 22% reduced risk of respiratory and diabetes deaths.

So it may be worth stocking up on some of those nut bags on sale in the supermarkets for the festive season. But carry the habit on right into the New Year and beyond.

Christmas Gift ideas for your elderly parents this year

present-2Wondering what to get your elderly parents for Christmas? If they’ve already got enough scarves and warm socks and they’ve told you they really don’t need anything… try looking around their home from a different perspective and see if there’s not something you can DO for them.

Try donning a pair of imaginary glasses, not Rose-Tinted but a pair of Elderly Lenses, and put yourself in their shoes as you move around your parents’ home and garden. Here’s some pointers:

START AT THE ENTRANCE. If there’s a step to either the front or back door, is there a sturdy handrail? Are the steps even? Turn your attention to outside lights. Is there good lighting outside the door?

Then come inside the door, when mum or dad locks the door at night, is the key left in the lock? This will mean no-one can unlock the door from outside if your parent is inside and needs help. If not in the lock, are the keys nearby in case they have to get out quickly? A handy solution can be a simple hook (either in the nearby wall or a suction hook on the door) for the keys to hang on. And don’t forget the doormat – is it a trip hazard?

REDUCE SLIPS AND TRIPS. On the subject of mats, check all the mats and rugs around the house. Are they curling up and causing a trip hazard? Replace them. Do they need a rubber liner underneath to stop them slipping? Cast your eyes around for potential trip hazards – wires or objects on the floor and see if they can be moved. Then turn your attention to footwear. Sloppy slippers, open-backed slippers, worn-out slippers, big-fluffy-loose-fitting slippers should all go.

BRIGHTEN THE PLACE UP. Pay attention to lighting inside too. As they get older and eyesight deteriorates, your parents may benefit from more powerful overhead light fixtures, as well as task lights carefully placed near work surfaces such as kitchen counters. Make sure that the ambient lighting is glare-free and at a consistent level from one room to the next to avoid eye strain.

VISIT THE BATHROOM. Mum or Dad might say they really don’t need grab rails in the bathroom. But when they are there, you do just use them without giving it a thought. If you do slip in the bathroom you tend to go down with a bump. So avoid it. Non-slip mat? Bath seat? Raised toilet seat?

GET TECHNOLOGICAL. There is no need to be completely tech savvy, but there are some useful gadgets. Do they receive lots of cold calls making them get up to answer the phone all the time? These can be screened and blocked. How about a daily skype or facetime? Not only does it keep you in touch but you can also see how they are looking.

Eyes on Diabetes – World Diabetes Day 14th November

diabetes-1Screening for type 2 diabetes is important to modify its course and reduce the risk of complications.

Diabetes is a huge and growing burden: 415 million adults were living with diabetes in 2015 and this number is expected to increase to around 642 million or one in ten adults by 2040.1

One in two adults with diabetes is undiagnosed.1

Many people live with type 2 diabetes for a long period of time without being aware of their condition. By the time of diagnosis, diabetes complications may already be present.

Up to 70% of type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented or delayed by adopting healthier lifestyles, equivalent to up to 160 million cases by 2040.1

With increasing levels of poor nutrition and physical inactivity among children in many countries, type 2 diabetes in childhood has the potential to become a global public health issue leading to serious health outcomes.1

12% of total global expenditure on health is currently spent on adults with diabetes.1

In many countries diabetes is a leading cause of blindness, cardiovascular disease, kidney failure and lower-limb amputation.

Yes, you can have your Little Red Button with you in the bath!

Woman stuck in bath for four days ‘saved by waitress’

This was the BBC headline on Monday. Jeremy Vine picked up the story on Tuesday on BBC Radio 2. After speaking live to the concerned waitress Sonia, and asking after Doreen, Jeremy went on to take some calls on the subject.
A lady from Sussex phoned in to say her mum had got stuck in the bath once. She explained how she had rung and rung through the morning but got no reply so asked one of her mum’s neighbours to let themselves in and check. “They found she had got stuck in the bath, couldn’t get out and was absolutely frozen and terrified.” The lady continued “Where was the lifeline? Of course she had taken it off because you are not supposed to wear it in the bath.”

Keep your little red button with you in the bath!

 And this is where I want to draw you attention – to that little red button and the bath. NO, the button does not like to be submerged in water for a long time but yes, it is showerproof. Which means it doesn’t mind a quick dunking in water. So if you are bathing, our advice is put your alarm button on the edge of the bath, right next to you. If it falls in, just fish it out again and it will be fine. If you are showering, you can wear it the whole time in the shower

It is designed to be with you through all your daily tasks in your home and garden. The button can be worn either around your neck or on a wrist strap. You choose, depending on which works best for you, and which is easiest for you to wear through the day. At night pop it by your bed, ready to put back on in the morning.little red button is showerproof

Kat Navarro

Contact Care: Little red button