Monthly Archives: March 2017

Contact Care: Ease your Hay Fever Symptoms.

Looking out of my window right now the sun is shining, a breeze is tickling the curtains and although the trees are still bare of leaves, it is a blue sky I see beyond them. But not everyone welcomes this time of year….

Contact Alarm Service with advice on relieving hay feverHay fever affects ¼ of the British population

One in four people are effected by hay fever, and unlike the name suggests (hay – harvest time) for many the tree pollen swirling in the air now is causing a runny nose and watery eyes.

There is over the counter medication to help. Additionally, you can help yourself. These five tips are provided by NHS Choices using information from a survey undertaken by the National Pollen and Aerobiology Research Unit of more than 2,000 people with hay fever, found that lifestyle factors, such as stress and exercise, can have a major impact on hay fever.

Five tips to reduce hay fever symptoms

1. Reduce your stress: Easier said than done, but try it anyway because a clear link was found between stress and the severity of hay fever symptoms. As stress levels drop, symptoms become milder.

2. Exercise more: Regular exercise can improve your hay fever. The survey found that people with hay fever who exercise most have the mildest symptoms. Exercise will also help reduce your stress levels, too. Aim to do 150 minutes (two and a half hours) of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise every week. Now, as this is hay fever season, you’ll be better doing it indoors. So put on that exercise video and get bouncing in the living-room. Or go to the gym or swimming-pool.

3. Eat well: The survey suggests those who eat a healthy diet are less likely to get severe symptoms. Be aware though, that some healthy foods can make hay fever symptoms worse. Foods that can worsen hay fever symptoms for some people include apples, tomatoes, stoned fruits, melons, bananas and celery.

Eat foods rich in omega 3 and 6 essential fats which can be found in oily fish, nuts, seeds, and their oils. These contain anti-inflammatory properties, and may help reduce symptoms of hay fever.

 Contact alarm Service and tree pollen4. Cut down on alcohol. Alcohol worsens hay fever because it contains histamine.

5. Sleep well: Try to avoid too many late nights during the hay fever season. The survey found that those who get a good night’s sleep tend to have the mildest symptoms. Just one in eight (13%) people who had at least seven hours sleep a night reported severe symptoms, compared with one in five (21%) who regularly had five hours sleep or less a night.

Kat Navarro

Contact Alarm Service – Contact Care

Independent Living in Norfolk and the Handyman Service

HandyPerson Services in Norfolk for Independent LivingI was recently in a meeting talking to a ‘Handyman’. This particular gent works for Broadland District Council and told me it can be hard to get the message out. To tell people there is a subsidised / free service for older people, to support independent living and staying safe at home.

Six of the Seven Norfolk District Councils offer the Service supporting Independent Living

So I looked into it. Six of the seven District Councils in Norfolk offer a Handyperson Service (Breckland Council doesn’t). Eligibility and cost vary slightly over the rest of Norfolk but the remit is the same. If you are elderly and need a small job doing in your home your local HandyPerson service can help you. This could be fitting grab rails, putting up shelves or installing a keysafe. Maybe fitting an access ramp, moving heavy furniture or fixing  leaking tap.

South Norfolk District Council offer their Handyman Service to everyone (any age) for £20 / hr, subsidized if you are over 65. Norwich City Council’s Handy Van Scheme is only for over 65’s and charges £15 / hr. This is the same as Broadland D.C.s Handy Person +, although these also offer signposting and information as part of their service. North Norfolk D.C. use the Benjamin Foundation to deliver their scheme, Ben’s Workforce, to the over 65’s.

Great Yarmouth Borough Council’s Handyperson Service is delivered by Safe at Home for £20 / hr to over 60’s, as is the Handyperson  Service in King’s Lynn and West Norfolk, delivered by the Careline Community Service.

In all cases these prices are lowered or waived if you are on means-tested benefits.

So stop looking at the front door that needs repainting, wondering how to get it done. Try your local council, get it done for a fixed rate by a trustworthy Handyperson.

Kat Navarro

Contact Care Lifeline Alarms aid Independent Living in Norfolk and Suffolk.

People who live near busy roads have higher dementia rates

Air pollution causes a range of conditions. Elevated levels or long term exposure are well-documented as affecting the respiratory and inflammatory systems. It can also lead to more serious conditions such as heart disease and cancer. Now BBC News reports: “people who live near major roads have higher rates of dementia”.

Canadian research into dementia and busy roads

A Canadian study found that people living within 50 metres of busy roads were 7% more likely to develop dementia. This is compared to people who live at least 300 metres away.

The results were produced by a major study that tracked all adults in Canada’s most populated province (Ontario) over 11 years.

Researchers also looked to see if a similar pattern was found with two other neurological conditions; Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis. They found no evidence of any link.

This study of 6.8 million people adds to evidence that living close to heavy traffic may have an effect on dementia. A study the NHS discussed last year found evidence that particles caused by air pollution can physically make their way into human brains.

While this type of study cannot prove that traffic or air pollution has caused the increase in dementia cases, a link is certainly in the realms of scientific possibility. Air pollution caused by traffic can lead to exposure to a wide range of damaging toxins, such as nitrogen oxides.

Exactly what policy makers can do to reduce any potential risk of exposure remains a matter of debate.

On an individual basis, there’s not much you can do if you live near a busy road, especially if you’re in a city where most people live near busy roads. However, it does make sense to reduce your exposure to pollution if you can. For example, by walking on the further side of the pavement.  Exercise in parks or back streets rather than along busy roads.

Where did this dementia story come from?

The study was carried out by researchers from a number of Canadian institutions: Public Health Ontario, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, University of Toronto, Dalhousie University, Oregon State University, Health Canada, and Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics in the US.

Kat Navarro

Contact Care Pendant Alarms, sharing information from NHS Choices